Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook

If there’s only room in your schedule to read one book on social media, this should be the one. Yes, it’s a few years old, but the concepts are solid. And, honestly, I can’t wait to share some highlights with you!

Give, Give, Give

For years, consumers have had marketing messages shoved down their throats at every turn. People have grown weary of it. I know I have. The beautiful thing about social media is that it allows companies/brands/influencers to build actual relationships with people.

The thing about trust and relationships is that they have to be built over time. You have to give something of value (jab) before asking for anything in return (right hook). Actually, you should give, give, give, give, give, then ask. Serve your audience well. Entertain, inform, inspire before asking for the sale.

Tell Great Stories

So… what makes a great story? I think this could be best summed up by a quote from the advertising great, Leo Burnett.

Make it simple. Make it memorable. Make it inviting to look at. Make it fun to read.

Gary expands on the concept by saying, “Be generous. Be informative. Be funny. Be inspiring. Be all the characteristics we enjoy in other human beings.” That last part is key. You’re a human, communicating with other humans. Be real. Don’t sound like a robot when you’re posting.

Create Native Content

Twitter is different from Instagram, which is different from Facebook, Pinterest, or Snapchat. The audience for each platform is distinct. Simply creating a post and throwing it up on all your channels isn’t going to be very effective. The imagery you use should feel like it belongs on that platform. And the language you use should be reflective of the audience on each platform.

Effort is the Great Equalizer

Other companies may have more employees and bigger budgets, but you can level the playing field with effort. As Gary says,

You can’t be everywhere at once, but when the quality of your communication and community-building efforts is better than anyone else’s, it doesn’t really matter.

You can show your audience you truly care. Be charming, funny, and personable. Think about who you’re trying to reach and give, give, give– then ask.